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Home Page Site Map. site map for www.Thailand-Delights.com Bangkok, Page 120, Phra Nakhon District, the Grand Palace, known in Thailand as Phra Borom Maha Ratcha Wan. Bangkok, Page 122, Phra Nakhon District, the Grand Palace, known in Thailand as Phra Borom Maha Ratcha Wan.

Phra Nakhon District, the Grand Palace, known in Thailand as Phra Borom Maha Ratcha Wan.


The palace itself is divided into three quarters: the outer quarters, the middle quarters and the inner quarters. Also in this Temple you will see a large model replica of  the old Royal City at Ankor Wat  in Cambodia. The Galleries are some of the first exhibits you will see entering this complex of incredible buildings.

These portray scenes from the Ramakien, first painted during the reign of King Rama 1. They have been restored several times over the years to maintain their condition and looks. The first scene of the story begins at the east gate opposite the Phra Wiharn Yod. The significant scenes from this story appear next to the gate leading to the Royal Palace.

The Grand Palace is divided into three main areas or zones.  The Outer Court, home to royal offices, public buildings and the Temple of Emerald Buddha. Then the  Middle Court, which is where the most important residential and state buildings are. Finally the Inner Court, which is exclusively reserved for the king and queen and their consorts.

The Palace is however still very much in use; as many royal rituals are performed here by the King every year. Other royal ceremonies celebrated here are coronations; royal funerals, marriages and state banquets. The Palace grounds also contain the offices and buildings of the Bureau of the Royal Household, the Office of the Private Secretary to the King and Royal Institute of Thailand.

Within the complex are many buildings that are in daily use and were built in  different styles reflecting the architecture of the various reigns. However, despite their differences  most of the structures adhere strictly to traditional Thai style. There are 12 small pavilions surrounding the Ubosot or Chapel.

Phra Maha Monthian complex, and its accompanying buildings has been the residence of Siam's kings before King Rama V decided to move to the Chitralada Palace in Dusit, next to the parliament building.